Dorset knob noshing tradition proves an online hit via Zoom

Tuesday, May 12th, 2020
Dorset knob noshing tradition proves an online hit via Zoom

Traditional Dorset eating contest draws wide entry and big crowds watching online

Coronavirus may have put paid to the Olympics, Wimbledon, the British Grand Prix and Euro2020 – but there is one flagship British event on the ‘sporting’ calendar that has carried on regardless; that is the bastion of country life tradition that is Dorset’s annual knob-eating competition.

The event, thought to derive its name from the Dorset ‘knob button’ made locally, has all the muddy ingredients to catch our attention; tasty biscuits crafted to a 150 year old family recipe by Moores of Morecomebelake, tea (cider if you choose), dunking, and a 60 second countdown in which to indulge as many as you can to be crowned champ.

It’s epic. It’s a spectacle. It’s traditional – and it’s very crumbly (not forgetting dry-mouthed).

In usual times, the annual knob-eating competition typically attracts a wide entry and big crowds. This year, despite moving online for the first time in its history, has been no different with over 100 competitors signing up to take the head-to-head challenge remotely from their home over webcams on Zoom with thousands tuning in to watch the live steam on social media.

Ordinarily scheduled to take place at Cattistock Fete, in West Dorset, organisers said entries had come in from all corners of the UK, including Castle Donington, Ellesmere Port and Cockermouth with contestants praised for their novel ‘noshing’ techniques.

And after a full day of heats, and bagfuls of innuendo that knew no bounds, it was Kate Scott who ran out Knob Noshing Champion for 2020.

Its sister event, the Dorset knob-throwing festival, has been postponed until 2021. Proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to local charity, Weldmar Hospicecare.

A little bit of digging – and more double entendre than we care to mention, the world wide web tells us that Dorset knobs are best eaten with Blue Vinny cheese, dipped in Dorset tea or cider or served scone-esque with cream and honey.

One thing is sure; we love it.